Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Week 10: John Scarborough III

John Scarborough III, my 7th great-grandfather, was born in 1667. He married Mary Peirson at Middletown Monthly Meeting, Bucks, Pennsylvania in 1690. Mary was the daughter of Edward Pearson and Sarah Burgis. She died on January 23, 1751 at Solebury Township, Bucks, Pennsylvania.

Children of John Scarborough III and Mary Peirson:
  • William Scarborough b. 30 Oct 1691, d. April 1727
  • Sarah M. Scarborough b. 4 Feb 1694, d. 4 May 1748
  • Mary Scarborough b. 8 Aug 1695, d. 14 Jan 1787
  • Susannah Scarborough b. 19 May 1697, d. 14 Mar 1718/19
  • Elizabeth Scarborough b. 31 Aug 1704, d. bt 1742-1792
  • Hannah Scarborough b. 31 Aug 1704, d. 21 Feb 1742/43
  • John Scarborough IV b. 1706, d. 5 May 1769
  • Robert Scarborough b. 10 Aug 1708, d. 19 Mar 1805
John (III) and his father, John Scarborough II, were Quakers and came to America in 1682 from London, England, with other Quakers and settled in Pennsylvania. John Scarborough II's wife, Sarah, was not a Quaker, but their children were. In 1682 father and son accepted William Penn's invitation to come to America for religious freedom. Father purchased, while in England on July 4, 1682, 250 acres along the Neshaminy Creek near Langhorne in Bucks County for five pounds. Father and son, then about 15-years-old, arrived in Pennsylvania in October of 1682. They stayed in Bucks County, just north of Philadelphia for almost two years. John II returned in 1684 to England to bring the rest of his family to America, leaving his 17-year-old son, John III, in America. John II's wife Sarah was deathly afraid of the long sea voyage and they never came back to America. John II remained in London until his death on April 11, 1706, leaving John III alone in America.

John the III spent some ten years in the wilds of Bucks County living with the Indians. It was said in "The Friend" Vol. 29, p. 244, that "John Jr. being somewhat irked by the strictness of the friends in whose care he had been left ran away and lived with the Indians for a number of years." A statement in the Evening Bulletin of Philadelphia said that John Scarborough was the interpreter for William Penn when the latter met with the Indians. Samuel Preston, a great-grandson born in 1756, said that John Scarborough III was once instrumental in preventing an Indian war. He was said to have often visited the Indians on religious missions for the Quakers. He was the first white man to actually settle in Solebury/Buckingham Valley.

John was a very active member of the "friends" faith. He became a well-known and highly esteemed Quaker preacher. He also became active in the Quaker faith in England, and in 1724 was recommended as a minister in the church.

John died on January 27, 1725 or 26 at Solebury Township, Bucks, Pennsylvania. His will, proven October 2, 1727, disposed of the remainder of his real estate and personal property as follows:

"To my son Wm. Scarborough, 60 acres of land with the Little Meadow therein which he hath now in his Poss(ess)ion...." to "my loving wife Mary Scarborough my Plantation containing 200 acres of land having the lake meadow therein for and during her natural life and at her Decease I will it to my son Wm enjoy the same for and during his natural life and after his Decease to ye Male Heirs of his Body lawfully Begotten And if there be none such at the Death of my son Wm. Then my will is that the Said Plantation goes to the next Male heir of Law of the Scarborough's."

According to the Bucks County Historical Society in Doyelstown, Pennsylvania, the 60-are farm that was part of Scarborough's first tract of 510 acres later belonged to the Paxson family for several generations. They called the place "Rolling Green" and as of 1988, the house on the corner of Old York Road and Aquetong Road is still known by that name. This is recorded in the book "Along the Old York Road" by James and Margaret Cawley. The house was built in 1748. The farm owned by Isaac Scarborough was not the same Rolling Green, but was on a different part of the 510-acr tract.

Some building lots in Philadelphia were also divided by John Scarborough's will among his sons and daughters. Some of the most valuable of is personal property was to be disposed of at the time of his death or remarriage of his wife as follows: "To my Son  Wm. my Bible and my brass mortar. To my Son Robert my Silver Dram Cup and my Pewter Salt Seller to my daughter Sarah Haworth (my 6th-great grandmother) my brass warming pan To my daughter Mary Oickring my Great Iron Pottage Pott to my daughter Elizth Fisher my Silver Spoon and a Pinquishin with a Drawer for it and a Pewter Still To my Daughter Hannah one brass  Candlestick and a pair of Iron Snuffers and a Joint Stool." President Herbert Hoover also descends from his daughter Sarah Scarborough and George Haworth.

Children of John Scarborough III and Mary Peirson:
  • William Scarborough b. 30 Oct 1691, d. April 1727
  • Sarah M. Scarborough b. 4 Feb 1694, d. 4 May 1748
  • Mary Scarborough b. 8 Aug 1695, d. 14 Jan 1787
  • Susannah Scarborough b. 19 May 1697, d. 14 Mar 1718/19
  • Elizabeth Scarborough b. 31 Aug 1704, d. bt 1742-1792
  • Hannah Scarborough b. 31 Aug 1704, d. 21 Feb 1742/43
  • John Scarborough IV b. 1706, d. 5 May 1769
  • Robert Scarborough b. 10 Aug 1708, d. 19 Mar 1805
Citations
  1. Broderbund Software, Inc., World Family Tree Vol. 3, Ed. 1, (Release date February 9, 1996), "CD-ROM," 3:2604.
  2. Broderbund Software, Inc., World Family Tree, Vol. 6, Ed. 1, "CD-ROM," Tree #2613, Date of Import: Nov 25, 1999.
  3. Broderbund Software, Inc., World Family Tree Vol. 5, Ed. 1, (Release date: August 22, 1996), "CD-ROM," Tree #1660.
  4. Bill Putnam, Electronically Published Family History, July 13, 2012, billputnam.com/Scarborough.pdf.
  5. Lyla Ann May, From Prairie to Palestine: The Eva Marshall Totah Story.

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