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Anna Marilda Lowell

Anna Marilda Lowell was my 2nd great-grandmother and was the wife of  David See. She was born in April 1847 in Ohio to Barnabas Lowell (I'm descended from a murdering pirate, The Murdering Pirate, Pat 2) and Joanna Titcomb. She may have been a twin as I've also seen an Anna Mariah listed as the daughter of Barnabas Lowell and Joanna Titcomb, of the same age. After the murder of her mother when she was about six years old and her father was incarcerated, the children appear to have been spread out among the citizens of of the neighboring area as an Anna M. Lowell, age 7, was recorded in the household of Isaac and Maria McCory and their children in Elkhart, Polk County, Iowa.

Anna married David See on 9 November 1865 in Story County, Iowa and they had ten known children, including my great-grandmother, the elusive Hattie Jane See. You might remember I mentioned her in my David See post.

David passed away in 1893 and Anna remarried on 7 April 1899 to Franklin Roush. If the name Roush/Rouse sounds familiar, that is the surname of Hattie Jane's husband. You see, Franklin Roush is my 2nd great-grandfather too, the father of Hattie Jane's husband, William Adam Rouse. The 1900 U.S. Census shows the family living on East Court in Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa with three of Anna's younger children residing with them. Anna died on 19 May 1912 in Des Moines, Iowa and is buried in Woodland Cemetery next to Franklin Roush.

Anna's marriage to Franklin Roush and a mistake on my part, lead me to find the Civil War Pension File and request the documents. As I've stated before, my grandmother, Anna Mae Rouse, was a young child when her mother passed away. Remember, I don't know when her mother died nor where Anna lived after her mother's death. While searching for this information, I found a U.S. Civil War Pension Index card for David See, showing widow as See, Anna M. and Minors as Roush, Anna M. Gdn. It has an entry of 1899 May 1 for Minor application no. 697463. I jumped to the conclusion it was referring to my grandmother Anna Mae Rouse and did a happy dance.


Finally, I thought, I now knew her mother was dead as of the date of this document and, for some reason, was under the guardianship of her grandmother. I figured the Pension File surely had information on her mother's death. I was so happy because of my "conclusion."  Of course, I now HAD to have the pension file. I could go through the Archives and pay them $75 for up to one hour of work and 100 pages of documents, and, it wait until they fulfilled it--who knows how long that would be. OR I could find a private researcher. I located my individual, she quoted me a price of $25/per hour and could do it the next day and thought it would only take her one hour as I had sent her the applicaiton numbers. It ended up taking her a bit longer, but she sent me 110 pages of documents. Unfortunately I could find no reference to my grandmother. Remember, Anna Marilda remarried Franklin Roush on 7 April 1899. This is just showing her married name I'm assuming.

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