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William Loughry


21 Jan 2017....As part of my commitment to write more this year, I'm going to participate in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge

Sometime ago I wrote about The Loghry Line. William Loughry is as far back as I've been able to go with this line. I believe William was born around 1743, either in Ireland or Scotland. He resided for sometime in eastern Pennsylvania, probably Northumberland County and also in Luzerne County, about ten miles from Wilkes Barre.
History of the county of Westmoreland, Pennsylvania

He married Nancy Purdy in Pennsylvania. Nancy was reportedly born 1 Sep 1748 in Ireland. Stacy Jackson wrote an article, Old Family History Traced by Jackson, that was published in The Canisteo Times on 22 Feb 1940. This article mentioned this family.

"An incident related by Mrs. Hannah M.  Jones, a resident of the Swale, Cameron township, of her ancestress, Mrs. William Loghry, is but one of thousands denoting the harrowing experiences of colonial periods.  William Loghry married and resided in a Pennsylvania village in Luzerne County, Penna. Later he took up a tract in the wilderness ten miles from neighbors, where he erected a log cabin and removed his family, wife, small daughter and infant twin sons. During an absence from home of several days, one of the twins sickened (article cuts off here), but the family traditions, as told by Mrs. Hannah Jones, is that the child died. As the weather was warm, decomposition soon set in and as there was no one else at hand, the babe's mother had to dig the grave and bury her child. How sad this must have been. Mrs. Hannah Jones' father was Peter H. Drake, who married Lettie Santee (my 1st cousin 4 times removed), daughter of Isaac (my 3rd great-great uncle) and Nancy Moore (my 1st cousin 4 times removed). Mrs. Jones retained her memory to the last and delighted to tell stories of the period of her youth.
Canisteo Times 22 Feb 1940
Unknown Publication or Date Published
This couple had three children that we know of:  Mary, born about 1773, and the twin boys born about 1777. I do not have a name for the twin that died, but the other twin was my third great-grandfather, Joseph Leander Loghry. He is believed to have served in the American Revolution, but I have not yet been able to provide the proof necessary for membership in The Daughters of the American Revolution. One William Lockry is listed in service in April 1779 in the County of Westmoreland as a captain.
William Lockry, in service April, 1779
The 1790 U.S. census shows one William Lockry residing then in Luzerne County, whose family consisted of one male child  under 16 years of age, a wife, and one daughter. This coincides with the traditions of the family as told by Mrs. Hanna Jones.
1790 U.S. census
William Lockrey appeared in the 1810 U.S. census in Canisteo, Steuben county, New York. The household consisted of one male, over age 45, 1 female between the ages of 10 thru 15, one household member under age 16 and two household members over 25.
1810 U.S. census
William lived a long life, especially for this time period, and died at about 94 years of age. He was buried in Browns Crossing Burying Grounds, Browns Crossing, Steuben County, New York.

Sources

1. Sparkle Loghry Information Sheet.
2. Stacy Jackson, History of Cameron Corners: Jackson's History of Cameron
     Corners.
3. Browns Crossing Cemetery of Canisteo, New York.  .... Stacy Jackson, History
     of Cameron Corners: Jackson's History of Cameron Corners.  .... Linda
     Walker, Walker to Bergerud, Notes, April 1996, Recipient: to Wendy
     Bergerud (notes dated April 1996.).
4. Carol Max from Irene Loghry, Loghry - Santee, Family Group Sheet, Record
     Type: family group sheet, Subject: Joseph Leander-Mary Santee (circa
     September 1996).
5. Linda Walker, Walker to Bergerud, Notes, April 1996, Recipient: to Wendy
     Bergerud (notes dated April 1996.).  .... Compiler: Edmund West, Family
     Data Collection -- Marriages (Ancestry.com, Provo, UT, 2001). [database
     online]
6. Compiler: Edmund West, Family Data Collection -- Marriages (Ancestry.com,
     Provo, UT, 2001). [database online]


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